Current Exhibitions

Frank Bruckmann: Studio Still Lifes

&

Edith Borax-Morrison: Monoliths and Magic

February 16 - March 19, 2017

Reception: March 11, 3 - 6 pm

with Artist Talks @ 5pm

 

Discover the Artist at Work: New Shows at Kehler Liddell Gallery: Thursday, February 16 - Sunday, March 19

Step into the mind of the artist in two new Kehler Liddell Gallery shows: Monoliths and Magic by Edith Borax-Morrison, and Studio Still Lifes by Frank Bruckmann. Together, the works of Borax-Morrison and Bruckmann bear witness to the daily workings of an artist: the mindset, the mechanics and the necessary materials to make art. Both shows are on view at the Westville gallery from Thursday, February 16 through Sunday, March 19, with an Opening Reception planned for Saturday, March 11 from 3pm - 6pm.

The intricate interwoven lines, circles and marks in Borax-Morrison’s abstract drawings speak to the very nature of the artist: consistent, compulsive, with meticulous attention to detail. On display in Monoliths and Magic are a series of small pen and ink drawings from the artist's sketchbook, revealing how her “mind fibers” or “penweave” drawings take shape. From sketchbook to larger formats, the show also includes a group of drawings from “Mollie’s Magic” and a series of monoliths. 

“My work is influenced by surreal, mystical, and psychological elements from the past,” explains Borax-Morrison. “I am also fascinated with weaving, hair, fairy tales, myths, and primitive societies. All of which appear in my work.” 

For Studio Still Lifes, Bruckmann has composed a collection of oil paintings depicting the life in his studio. Increasing the mission of the materials that are foundations to every piece of his artwork—crimped oil paint tubes, bottles of viscous medium, ancient canvas pliers—they are abruptly shifted to the forefront as the very subject, keenly observed and elevated into objects of art, no longer worthy only to the artist.

Bruckmann’s brushstrokes, use of color, form and texture are his mechanisms to paint the tools of the art studio, creating a lusher and nearly kinetic subject. Though referred to as a “still life,” visits will find that they are more about “life” than “still.”